next up previous contents
Next: Contents   Contents

SBSAT User Manual and Quick Start Guide

JOHN FRANCO, MICHAL KOURIL, SEAN WEAVER

SBSAT Version 2.5b-5, January 2007

Welcome to SBSAT:
a State Based Satisfiability Solver

SBSAT is a software package used primarily for solving instances of a generalization of the well-known Satisfiability problem. In particular, the problem solved by SBSAT is the following:

GIVEN: Input variable set $V=\{v_{1},...,v_{n}\}$ of Boolean variables, set of Boolean functions $B=\{f_{1},...,f_{m}\}$ where, for all $i$, $f_{i}$ maps an assignment of values to variables of $V$ to $\{T,F\}$.
   
RESULT: An assignment of values to variables of $V$ such that, for all $i$, $f_{i}=T$, or unsatisfiable if no such assignment is possible.



If, for all $i$, $f_{i}$ is a function corresponding to the conjunction of a subset of variables of $V$, then the problem is reduced to the well-studied Boolean Satisfiability Problem. If the variables of $V$ are allowed to take arbitrarily many values, then the problem becomes the well-studied Constraint Satisfaction Problem.

The functions $B$ may be specified in several different ways. But, there is one canonical input specification format, which we call the canonical form: a conjunction of a collection of BDDs1. Any recognized user input is translated to the canonical form, if it is not in that form already. Of course, the user is free to supply his/her own translation to BDDs which then may be input: in this way all possible input formats can be accommodated. Specific, supported input formats are:

$\bullet$
CNF (Conjunctive Normal Form - described in Sections [*] and [*])
$\bullet$
DNF (Disjunctive Normal Form - described in Section [*])
$\bullet$
BDD (SBSAT canonical form - described in Sections [*],[*])
$\bullet$
SMURF (described in Section [*])
$\bullet$
Trace (From CMU benchmark examples - described in Section [*])
$\bullet$
Prove (Generated by CMU tool BMC - described in Section [*])
$\bullet$
XOR (Each conjoint is an XOR of conjoints - see Sections [*],[*])

Examples of how a user might develop a custom translation to the canonical form from other formats are found in Section [*].

For maximum effectiveness, the user should be aware of and know how to control the three phases of SBSAT execution, shown schematically in Figure [*]. In the first phase an input is read from an input file. The user must decide which input format to use and build the input file accordingly. There are three issues here: namely choosing the type of input format, writing the input in a way that can be exploited by elements of the remaining phases, and keeping the syntax correct. Format types and syntax are described in Sections [*] and [*]. Comments on writing exploitable input may be found in Section [*]. In the second phase various levels of preprocessing are applied to the input instance with the intention of producing an internal set of constraints (in canonical form) that are either logically equivalent 2 or equi-satisfiable 3 to the original and yields a smaller search space through advanced and intelligent search heuristics and learning. The user may control this phase using command line switches when launching the program. Details of the kinds of preprocessing available and their effects are found in Sections [*] and [*] along with examples of their use. In the third phase the internal form (that is, set of constraints in canonical form) is searched for a solution. The user must choose one of the ways to perform a search and the search heuristic which is used to select unassigned variables to be assigned values. Future versions will allow the user to define a search heuristic and coordinating preprocessing elements. Choices for searching are:

$\bullet$
SMURF (Default backtracking solver - Section [*])
$\bullet$
BDD WalkSAT (an incomplete solver - Section [*])
$\bullet$
WVF (Vanfleet's tinkering solver - Section [*])
$\bullet$
Simple (A stripped-down version of the SMURF solver - Section [*])

Reasons for choosing one of the above are given in Sections [*]-[*]. Search heuristics are used to help control the size of the search space. In the current version the user may choose one of the following to control the SMURF solver:

$\bullet$
VSIDS (Section [*])
$\bullet$
Locally Skewed, Globally Balanced (Johnson generalization - Section [*])

$\bullet$
Combination of the above two

The user may also choose one of the following to control the BDD WalkSAT solver:

$\bullet$
Adaptive Novelty+ (Section [*])
$\bullet$
Novelty+ (Section [*])
$\bullet$
Random (Section [*])

The size of the search space can be further controlled through learning. As backtracks occur, new constraints, called Lemmas (described in Section [*]), also referred to as conflict clauses, or learned clauses, are added to the internal constraint set. These can prevent some fruitless backtracking later in the search. However, there is some overhead incurred by Lemmas. Hence it is important to choose carefully which Lemmas are to be saved, how many Lemmas can be saved at a maximum, and which Lemmas to discard when the maximum is exceeded. These choices are controlled by switches on the command line and are described in Section [*]. The results of operations initiated by those switches are explained in Section [*].

Figure: Schematic depiction of controllable execution paths of SBSAT.
\begin{figure}\centerline{\epsfig{figure=Fig/layout.eps,width=4in}}
\end{figure}

The solver was successfully tested and compiled on a number of Unix based platforms such as Linux, DEC, Solaris, Mac OS X, Windows/Cygwin with a number of different compilers such as gcc2.95, gcc3.x, solaris-cc, dec-cc, pgcc.




next up previous contents
Next: Contents   Contents
John Franco 2011-09-15