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Conventions

When describing command line or file line syntax the following conventions apply. Items of important types are signified by enclosing the item in angle brackets. For example,


<var>


is an item of type <var>. Presumably the types used are defined in the text in close proximity to the first place they occur. The unterminated ellipsis (...) is used to indicate that arbitrarily many items of the type preceeding the ellipsis are possible after it. For example,


<var> <var> ...


means at least two items of type <var>, separated by blanks. and


<var><var>...


means at least two items of type <var>, not separated by blanks. A terminated ellipsis is used to indicate a list of finite size (one or more elements). For example,


var_1 ... var_n


means a list containing n items, $n\geq 1$ (the type of the items is described in the surrounding text). An optional flag or switch will be signified by enclosing it in square brackets. For example:


[-]<var> ...


means at least one <var> item may or may not be preceeded by the character '-'. The vertical bar ('|') separating items between square brackets ('[', ']') indicates a choice. For example:


[a|b|c]


means either a or b or c.

Various segments of an sbsat session will be highlighted using font changes to assist the reader in understanding the nature of command segments and results. Input and output will be specified using the typewriter font. For example, these segments appear like this


Reading file ...


The $ character at the beginning of a line is the command line prompt and indicates that what follows is a command to be executed. The prompt is usually followed by an sbsat command. For example, the following is a simple sbsat command:


$ sbsat file.cnf


Programming options appear in italics to contrast with option parameters which appear in plain text. For example, to get command line help use this command:


$ sbsat -help


An input file has keywords in boldface such as in the following:


and ($1, 2)


The $ of the previous line is not the command line prompt: its use in that context will be explained in Section [*].

Boolean Quantifiers and operators shall be written in the usual manner. Thus,
$\forall x$ means For all values of $x$
$\exists x$ means There exists a value for $x$ such that
$\neg$ means negation or complementation
$\vee$ means logical ``or''
$\wedge$ means logical ``and''
$\Rightarrow$ means logical ``implies''
$\oplus$ means logical ``exclusive-or''
$\equiv$ means equivalent
$\Leftrightarrow$ means ``if and only if''


next up previous contents
Next: Definitions Up: Conventions and Definitions Previous: Conventions and Definitions   Contents
John Franco 2011-09-15